Collaborations:

Finding Life: Brainstorm Part 01

What new technologies or search methods can be developed to identify life trapped under collapsed structures?

The process of mapping a disaster area and locating life is the most time consuming part of the search-and-rescue process. As you learned from the research materials, time is a critical factor, and if an injured person can receive treatment within the Golden Hour, they have a higher rate of survival. Currently, PJs rely heavily on canines for locating life, but animals have several limitations. This collaboration is an open brainstorm of ideas for locating life in confined spaces as quickly and efficiently as possible. At this stage, all ideas are viable—high tech, low tech, software, robotic, even biological. Post your ideas as a written description, a sketch, schematic and/or video. If you discover any existing tech or solutions online, please include the link. Think big. Think very small. Think unconventional. Your idea could save lives.

1 year, 11 months

Alternative Excavation Methods

by Ahmad F

Once the terrain and structure involving trapped persons is assessed; we may want to expand our debris (obstacle) removal techniques outside (or in tandem with) the realm of the mechanical. Precision application of corrosive liquids or liquid nitrogen might yield (or contribute to) faster breakthrough results (application varying on material and proximity to the trapped individual (and if the individual has access to PPE).

  • Warren W 1 year, 11 months

    Interesting is this cost effective and viable though. I don't know how much liquid nitrogen it takes to break a large amount of debris, but i doubt it would easy to get the tanks to the site fast too. still it is interesting.

  • Ahmad F 1 year, 11 months

    Thanks. :)

1 year, 11 months

Cardiophone Sensor Array

by Daniel G

My idea is that the human heart gives off a distinct sound, it's patterns differ depending on the heart rate of the victim but the average sound is still recognizable. To my knowledge there are four types of "energy" that we emit: Light, Heat, Sound, and Electricity. All of these have pros and cons, but looking a the big picture, there are ways that my idea exceeds the rest. For one, Heat sensing equipment is both expensive and unreliable, the operator has to direct the camera in a specific direction in order to see a heat signature. (In case of something like a FLIR). Light is useless, in the fact that if you can measure the light being reflected off of a victim, you are looking directly at them. Electricity is a viable option to pursue, sharks have organs designed specifically to sense the electricity that living things emit, but I don't think we are anywhere near developing something that could replicate those results. According to my idea we could place microphones on quad-rotors and have three of them fly around and listen for a human heartbeat, when they find one they would close in and confirm that it is in fact a human, and then alert the rescuers. Alternatively we could give the rescuers a hand held microphone that could be tossed around rubble to serve the same purpose, but at less cost, and less demand out of the quad-rotors. That's all I've got, suggestions?

  • Daniel G 1 year, 11 months

    After further research I've realized that the technology to sense electricity in the human body is closer than I thought, and that it is a viable option that could be used in these situation. Although I congratulate Kaylin S on her idea, and concept, I still think my idea is sound.

  • Thomas C 1 year, 11 months

    I think this is a very promising idea, but there is a problem whenever you use sound to find the people under the ruble. How will the robots determine the difference between the heart beat of someone trapped, and that of someone nearby the rubble. Does anyone know if their is a way to focus the microphone to only the rubble?

  • Daniel G 1 year, 11 months

    The arrangement of the directional microphones is what would allow us to discern whether or not the human is under the rubble. Also look three posts above this post to see a really cool type of microphone.

1 year, 11 months

Field Therapy

by Warren W

I know that the military usually goes into a situation with the idea that they will get the job done most effetely. This is great, but sometimes they don't compensate for other people's needs. They might be %100 focused on finding someone and stabilizing them, but then what? I think that therapist should be sent in %100 of the time with PJ's. People are delicate and fragile. To simply be saved from a disaster and then left at a refugee camp is not cutting it. We need therapist and counselors there to help them get through the trauma right then so as to not let PTSD set in. Even if the situation is too dangerous to bring in therapist then they can remotely talk to the victims via Skype or phone. http://www.navy.com/careers/healthcare/clinical-care/clinical-psych/?campaign=search_Reprise/Bing/Clinical+Psychology+Navy/navy%20psychologist/mkwid/seFu953bn|dc/pcrid/5239754796/pmt/b

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1 year, 11 months

Therapy in the field

by Warren W

I know that the military usually goes into a situation with the idea that they will get the job done most effetely. This is great, but sometimes they don't compensate for other people's needs. They might be %100 focused on finding someone and stabilizing them, but then what? I think that therapist should be sent in %100 of the time with PJ's. People are delicate and fragile. To simply be saved from a disaster and then left at a refugee camp is not cutting it. We need therapist and counselors there to help them get through the trauma right then so as to not let PTSD set in. Even if the situation is too dangerous to bring in therapist then they can remotely talk to the victims via Skype or phone.

  • Warren W 1 year, 11 months

    Ignore this post..... My computer lags and has a habit of re-posting things....

1 year, 11 months

Electromagnetic Sensing

by Jared H

The cardiovascular system produces an electromagnetic field that can be detected. A highly sensitive device could be programmed to ignore interference while recognizing the rhythmic pulse and the intensity of the body's electromagnetic field. Also, through the use of multiple devices, a person's exact location could be found through triangulation.

  • Weston B 1 year, 11 months

    I would be thourougly astounded at any device capable of detecting a human electromagnetic field over the noise of our modern world.

  • Daniel G 1 year, 11 months

    You have two ideas here, one: A highly sensitive device made to recognize the rhythmic pulse of the heart, and two: A highly sensitive device made to sense the body's electromagnetic field. I agree with you that the first could be accomplished, but the second is too far away technologically speaking to help us right now.

  • Jared H 1 year, 11 months

    Since an electrical stimuli is what causes the heart the beat, it actually produces a pattern in the body's electromagnetic field. As for detection of the field, currently sensors can do this from several feet away. If range could be increased then the devices could relay information through each other and to a central device. This would create a virtually boundless range based on the number of devices and their respective locations.

1 year, 11 months

Glottal Pulse

by Weston B

A new idea that I have further developed may be exactly what we need. What if we used a system designed to detect sound wave patterns. I put fourth this idea a while back, but have since improved it. We can mount a listening device on our drones that fly over rubble. Using this system, we can detect sounwave patterns unique to human speech while ignoring other noises. If a robot could do this effectiveley, we could detect the distance of a subject (the decibal level), the age of a subject (people of different ages have different freuency patterns in their speech), the gender of a subject (males have a lower voice), and the liklihood of a subject being in a certain place. This robot would play a kind of high tech marco polo only far better than any human ever could. This highly advanced patern recognition is reffered to as the Glottal Pulse which is a pattern that voices adhere to. The glottal pulse is produced by a humans vibrations in the glottus. When people scream for help under the rubble, their voice will adhere to a pattern. Upon request of the US air force, I would be more than happy to build a microcontroller and sensor cappable of recognising these patterns. Just time and funding are all that I request. My name is Weston Baccus, I am a student at Moorpark High School and Science is 80% of what I think about. I want to make this sensor a reality. You can read about the glottal pulse at: https://www.msu.edu/course/asc/232/study_guides/F0_and_Glottal_Pulse_Period.html

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  • Thomas C 1 year, 11 months

    That sounds interesting, but how would you propose to filter out the interference of the sounds of other people talking around the area?

  • Jill Ritter 1 year, 11 months

    Good work. Remember however, that many times a victim is unable to respond at all

  • Weston B 1 year, 11 months

    Just look for only certain frequencies, and further advance the listening device to permit it to listen exclusivley to frequencies in the human range. Another option is having multiple sensors each hearing a very thin range of frequencies, but very efficiently.

  • Gilbert N 1 year, 11 months

    If a person can not scream or make a vocal tone, they probably can not breath, or have sustained neurological damage. If this is the case, they may not survive rescue attempts.

1 year, 11 months

robot snake

by Conner k

why dont we use a robotic snake with micro motors,built in gps with a camera like a modified gopro hero 3 on the front and a gas detector on it. Use it to go between under or over broke buildings or cars house to find location of hurt humans to see if theres hazardous chemicals in the air.They should make them in different sizes t like really small to big as a medium size dog to pull people away from a burning car or house to seened in on stealth missions. they could go where no mans can go and they won't have fear of being destroyed they could get the job done faster i found a pic of something like what i'm thinking of on google images but not fully im going to add to this but im going to think more about it tomorrow Conner J Keen

1 year, 11 months

When in SAR, do as the Navy do

by Alastair W

I am a Cadet Airman First Class in the US Civil Air Patrol (an auxiliary of the Air Force), and I am heavily involved with the Search and Rescue Division, which means I know how crucial it is to locate a target as soon as possible. I believe we should build a UAV with heat seeking and sonar capabilities that is small enough to be piloted by a single person, and made of materials that are both cheap and easy to assemble, so any soldier can easily deploy them, and quickly locate the target(s). Cadet Airman First Class Alastair Willix Fairfax Composite Squadron DC-053 National Capitol Wing Civil Air Patrol

  • Alastair W 1 year, 11 months

    Also, we could include a capability that allows us to digitally construct the environment on top of whatever the sonar picks up.

1 year, 11 months

Tracking dust

by Andrew B

We could make a micro dust that can be tracked... dump a bunch of this dust on a collapsed building, and it will slowly accumulate in and around the trapped victim's lungs. Keep tracking the dust, and soon enough, you'll have some nice, bright, 'Rescue me here' spots sorted. Downsides? Possible -but unlikely- depriving a victim of their air. Also, very advanced tech, possibly non-existent. Also, may take a bit long for the dust to really settle out. Comments?

  • Dave M 1 year, 11 months

    If a dye could be developed that could be measured (low dose radioactivity comes to mind) it would need stick to the lung tissue to accumulate, not harm the body, flush naturally from the body after a given period of time...I really like this idea...

1 year, 11 months

MOVEMENT

by Nathan K

I was thinking of an idea of how a robot could move easily on rubble. my first idea was about roller balls like a ball pen but i failed to come up with a proper design though i made some sketches. Finally an Idea came from a screw! I tried to think of a way it could be used as a source of inspiration. Checking on YouTube, i landed on something exactly what i wanted. a battery power car that can easily move on anything. If Engineers improve the design and make it lighter, it can go far in a place affected by disaster. Just another Idea not flying over rubble but maneuvering through it. just below i put some illustrations Take a look at this link and see how the toy does it.

  • Nathan K 1 year, 11 months

    Any person's Idea can Improve mine.

  • Isaiah R 1 year, 11 months

    I suggest that the screws be made of rubber on the outside for sturdy grip.

  • Jill Ritter 1 year, 11 months

    I like this concept. think about size, weight, durability

  • Dave M 1 year, 11 months

    use omni wheels http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omni_wheel

  • Nathan K 1 year, 11 months

    Isaiah R, i think rubber is heavy. the screw themselves create there own grip just like how a real screw paves its way into a piece of wood. The wheels are meant to be light enough to float on water yet tough enough to maneuver through rubble. light weight would also reduce on the shifts in rubble while in action.

  • Nathan K 1 year, 11 months

    Jill Ritter, being an Artist, i would suggest this car be made of a jeep size, and the torpedo wheels be made of hard metal but with a mechanism of a submarine to allow it float or dive in water in case disaster is off land. My main emphasis on this was basically on the wheels.

1 year, 11 months

The Knight XV

by Amos A

The Knight XV can bring lots of security for the military to use with its cameras and special features even the best of cars don't have, such as a 26 inch TV and a very large as much as 62 gallons or more on request.

1 year, 11 months

Tracking People?

by Trinceton B

This is probably way beyond any means financially and would be extremely time consuming, but what if people in a disaster-prone area were given some sort of tracking device to keep on their person at all times? Maybe even give them subcutaneous chips, similar to those that some people put in their pets. Not only could this help with locating survivors and bodies, but it may also assist law enforcement in tracking suspects. Adding on to that idea, how hard would it be to create a chip that could monitor a survivor's vitals as well, or at least tell whether or not the person is alive so that PJs could prioritize who to extract from the wreckage?

  • Jack R 1 year, 11 months

    The simple problem is no one would approve, and it would be far to easy to abuse.

  • Trinceton B 1 year, 11 months

    Good point.

  • Warren W 1 year, 11 months

    If i was a suspect and i had a chip in me i would tear it out in like a millisecond. The UN also has a policy about chips in people. It says that they have to be close to the skin. No deep chips. Remember that america is the land of the free too.

  • Gilbert N 1 year, 11 months

    Our cellular networks already can pinpoint the location of multiple cellular phones. Just warn people before a disaster hits to stay close to people with cellular phones.

1 year, 11 months

Mice

by Kelvin P

Creating a mouse-sized robot that could get through rubble and have a camera connected to a PJ would make tracking using cameras much easier, instead of having a clumsy hose with a camera on the end, which have several limitations, a mouse robot could sense gas, heat signatures, and sound and still be very agile.

1 year, 11 months

Survival Pack

by Kelvin P

A pack of survival pack with essential gear could be placed on the victim and the a O2 mask, monitors, and other IV's would be in place. Also, there would be tourniquets, food and water for the victims survival. Also, instead of a PJ carrying a gun and so much armor, he could carry more survival gear and be more prepared (in a non-combat mission).

  • Jason C 1 year, 11 months

    They already do this when they are performing SAR missions and not CSAR missions.

1 year, 11 months

Snake it up!

by Sakariye S

An economically viable solution could be simple as gas signature and hydrocarbon detection; as the human body produces many substances with unique aromatic signatures. There must be some that are discernible in living human beings only. Pulsed emission of CO2 would indicate the process of respiration. Heat signatures are easy to obtain via inexpensive CCD-based cameras, assuming that rubble has not completely surrounded the victim. Overlapping multiple, different location methods would maximize chances of finding a living victim... What about a series of long, computer controlled snake-like robotic devices that can be maneuvered to search for any of these signs of life in a grid-based methodical manner? Gyroscopic navigation would be able to provide a relative location of survivors with great precision, and provide data and imaging streams for the purpose of rendering (via a portable computer or an uplink with a supercomputer that could process raw data and provide useful output while minimizing the processing time) for an assessment of current structural integrity and position of rubble. This would allow for an engineering-based approach, which would greatly reduce risk to rescuers and would, with the right programming, be able to provide the information in a manner that would be usable by trained individuals and untrained rescuers alike? (This is why most military branches have warrant officers!) The snake-like movement and capacity to obtain info useful to a structural engineer, combined with emphasis of computer processing resources rather than theoretical equipment, would possibly make this one of the more economical and technically viable solutions? Using pre-determined algorithms for S&R in collapsed structures minimizes the chance of judgment-based human error and issues of perceived moral responsibility during the search phase. "Drop the snakes!" And let them do their thing.

  • Gilbert N 1 year, 11 months

    You can put three ideas together, a robot mole that makes decisions based on ccd heat signatures, the human voice, tethered to a guide wire. The guide wire can be used to push needed supplies.